The Salmagundi Birthday Book 1882

I came across another family treasure, the Salmagundi Birthday Book. This was given to Sarah A. Chadwick by her brother John W. Chadwick for Christmas in 1882.  This book has a lovely red floral cover with pages with red borders that set off each page and a gilt edge.  I was curious what Salmagundi was and found a description of this book in a Publisher Weekly paper. It was classified as “one of the best and most distinctly commemorative set of the growing collection of ‘Birthday books’.” Salmagundi was an English dish of chopped meats, anchovies, eggs with a garnish of onions, lemon juice, oil and condiments.  The modern definition is a general mixture or miscellaneous collection.  That is just what this book is, a collection of poets and prose writers from all times.  Each page has 2 selections on each day of the month from famous writers and the beginning of each month has an etching done by various artists.  It was advertised as an attractive ornament for the drawing room table and not too bulky for use and handling.  It was sold in a lovely box for a price of $4.00.  How lucky Sarah Chadwick was to receive this gift.  She entered several family members’ birthdays in her book, giving us a glimpse of her family.  

Sarah A. Chadwick is my first cousin 3 times removed.  She was born in Marblehead on May 17, 1837, the daughter of John White Chadwick and Jane Standley   As like last week’s blog we are introduced to the Standley/Stanley family again, with either the “d” or the missing “d”.  In this book I found that even members of the same family household spelled it differently.  Sarah never married and was the caretaker for her father for 22 years after the passing of her mother.  Her obituary was published in the Marblehead Messenger on April 22, 1904:

Sudden Death of Miss Chadwick

Miss Sarah A. Chadwick of 2 Bowden Street died very suddenly on Tuesday evening, the 19th instant.  Though her health has been impaired there was no special premonition of serious illness.  She attended church on Sunday, the Unitarian, to which she was devotedly attached, and on Tuesday afternoon she took tea with her cousin, Mrs. George Pope.  On her way home, accompanied by her cousin and housemate, Miss Jennie Stanley, her breathing became painful and it was with great difficulty that she reached the residence of her aunt, Mrs. Joanna Herrick, where, being laid upon the bed, she soon ceased to breathe.  Members of her family, including her father and grandmother, had lived in the house where she died through a continuous period of seventy years duration, so that if she did not “die in her nest,” the event was not without some gracious element.  She leaves a brother, Rev. John W. Chadwick, and a circle of friends to whom she was warmly attached, and whose affection she could not prize beyond its worth.  The funeral service will be conducted by the Rev. Albert Walkly, at her late residence, at 2 o’clock on Friday afternoon.

Sarah’s father, John White Chadwick had an interesting life.  He was born in Marblehead, MA on November 18, 1809, as shown in Sarah’s birthday book. He married Jane Standley on January 19, 1934 in Marblehead.    Jane was born, according to the Marblehead birth records on April 12, 1812, however her birthday is written in on the date of April 28 in the birthday book.   John and Jane had 3 children:

  1. Jane Elizabeth born on November 23, 1834; she remained single and died August 20, 1869.
  2. Sarah A  born May 17, 1837  and died April 19, 1904
  3. John White Chadwick, Jr. born October 19. 1840 and died December 11, 1904.  He became a minister. (the subject of a future blog)

John White Chadwick Sr. was born in Marblehead on November 18. 1809 in the house which sits back from the street opposite the Unitarian Meeting House.  He began his seafaring life when he was 13 years old, sailing with an Uncle and continued this way of life until 1860. His father Charles Chadwick was lost at sea in 1815 when John was 6 years old.  John made his first voyage to the Grand Bans in March of 1824. For the next 6 years (1825-30) he sailed with another Uncle, Skipper John White in Edmund Kimhalls’ “Hope” for two fares each year.

The first vessel he sailed on as “Skipper Chadwick” was the Ploughboy in 1832, owned by Josiah P. Cressy.  In 1834 he was a master of the vessel “The Statesman” of which he was 1/3 owner and he was now Cap’n Chadwick.  During the winter when he was fishing he was a shoemaker.  The following year he sold his 1/3 of “The Statesman” and bought 1/3 of the “Hero” paying $333.33.  He fished this boat through the Great Gale of 1846, in which many   Marbleheader’s perished, including some of his relative; his brother Charles and his cousin John White.  He thought of quitting the fishing trade after this but continued working until 1859. The “Hero” was sold in January 1847, when he then began fishing for mackerel in the Bay of off Mount Desert, Maine where he meet more of the Stanley family, as they were the founders of the Cranberry Islands in Maine.

John met his wife, Jane Standley in 1830, his first sight of her was when she was sitting in the chimney-corner crying with a toothache. She had just returned from Oxford, MA where her father had taken the whole family to work in the Slater Mill.  Her brothers were teasing her and John’s sympathy was the beginning of a happy ending. They were engaged in the spring of 1831 and married by Parson Bartlett on January 19, 1834. Parson Bartlett tried for several years to join the church but Jane thought she “was not good enough.”   When John returned home from sea on November 25 he found a two day old daughter waiting for him.  They called her Jennie.

John died on March 21, 1896 and his obituary appeared in the March 27, 1896 edition of the Marblehead Messenger:

“John White Chadwick died at his home on Bowden Street, last Saturday at the age of 86 years, 4 months and 3 days. Until his last days his memory of the Great Gale of 1846 was perfectly clear and so was his memory of his life and general. The days on which he had sailed and came home again, the amount of salt he carried, how the wind veered on such and such a day and all the other various incidents of danger, storms and wrecks.  He was always respected and valued by his townsmen, in his old age he was the object of a wide affection and no man was every prouder of his friends or more appreciative of their beautiful fidelity. Remarkable for his physical strength and endurance, his health was broken in his 80th year by an attack of pneumonia. He rallied slowly but during the last years he suffered greatly. A persistent reader of good books, he at length overtaxed his eyes and the consequent deprivation was a grievous one to bear.  His last sickness was only a week long” His funeral was held at the Unitarian Church was most appropriate because he was the last survivor of those who contributed to the original building of that house of worship.”

His son John White Chadwick Jr. wrote and book entitled; John White Chadwick – A Sketch of his Life by his son John White Chadwick. It was printed but never published by George H. Ellis, Printer in Boston, MA in 1896.  I am lucky enough to have a copy.

The Story of Mary Jane Standley and James W. Hawkes of Marblehead

I found a beautiful old autograph book given to Jennie M. Stanley on Christmas in 1883 from her Cousin Sarah. This was found in a treasure box of family memorabilia so I knew it had to be Mary Jane Standley Hawkes, my second great aunt.  The Standley family is a large family and some of the family kept the “d” in their name and some of them changed it to Stanley. 

This was a beautiful book called the Golden Floral Album with many floral print pages along with blank pages.  Mary Jane or “Jennie” as she was called by friends and family from what I can tell used hers as an autograph book.  Autograph books have been around since the mid- 16th century in Europe.  By the early 19th century Victorian albums, like the one shown here were very popular.  This one was most likely created by Jacob A. Zoll who began making them around 1880.  Autograph books can provide a fascinating way to understand social interactions and bits of genealogy.  They can contain signatures and message from friends and show family handwriting and drawings.

Before I found this album all I knew of the family was that Mary Jane Standley was born on November 26, 1868 in Marblehead to George Wills Standley and Ruth Blaney Freeto. I knew she married James W. Hawkes on October 1, 1914 in Marblehead.  He was born on January 24, 1866 in Marblehead to James Hawkes and Martha A. Rix.  He died on January 16, 1916 at 42 Lee Street in Marblehead having been married only a few years.  Mary Jane remained a widow and died in July 1954 at 32 Beacon Street in Marblehead.  They were married late in life and had no children.

I turned to the first page in Jennie’s book and find the following message in beautiful handwriting:

         

Page from Mary Jane’s autograph book.

              

Now what could this mean – were they friends, lovers, was he proposing to her? He was 22 and she was 20 at the time. He wrote this in 1888 and they were not married until 1914, was it a long courtship, did they part ways and reunite.  We will probably never know the answer but I did some research and found a little bit about their lives.  They both seemed to have a difficult life.

Jennie’s mother, Ruth Blaney Freeto Standley died 10 days after her daughter’s birth on December 7, 1868.  This now left her father, George W. Standley with an infant and several other children to care for.  George and Ruth had a total of eight children, several dying at a young age.  In the 1870 census we find George age 51 working in a shoe factory along with is son, George, Jr. age 20.  His 16 year old daughter, Elizabeth at home keeping house, his 14 year old son William working in a shoe factory, his 4 year old daughter and Mary J age 1.  Also living with them was his mother in law Grace Freeto age 76.

In 1880 when Jennie was 11 she was living with her 85 year old grandmother Grace Freeto who was an invalid and died a year later in 1881. According to a Trustees Letter dated 1878 when Grace Freeto died her estate was given in trust to Mary Jane Standley, a total of $50.  In Grace’s probate file there is mention that she adopted Mary Jane.   Unfortunately there is no 1890 census so what happened to poor Mary Jane (Jennie) at that time is unknown. It appears from her autograph book that she may have graduated from the Marblehead Academy School on June 12, 1884. Her Marblehead High School Diploma says “Jennie M. Standley” graduated on July 1, 1887.

 In 1900 she lived with her Cousin Sarah Chadwick age 63 at 7 Bowden Street, Marblehead.   Mary Jane was 31 and worked for the Metcalf Box Company. Sarah is the cousin who gave her the autograph book in 1883.  Sarah died in 1904 and it appears Mary Jane went to live with her sister Elizabeth Phillips and her family, down the street at 2 Bowden.

Now let’s see what was going on in James W. Hawkes life during this time.  In 1870 he was two years old living with his parents and 12 year old sister, Mary Jane Hawkes. Could this be why he referred to his wife as Jennie?   In 1880 he was living with his parents and his 9 year old sister, Carrie, both attending school.

Once again the missing 1890 census leaves us with a gap.  From the Marblehead Messenger I found an article saying had been working as a clerk with his Uncle, Mr. T.P.M. Rix in his store on Washington St. across from the Town House.  James bought his Uncle out on June 18, 1892 and he began running a fruit store in the building.

In 1900 he was single, living with his parents at 11 Lee Street and working as a tobacco salesman in a store.  In 1910 he was living with his mother at 11 Lee Street and his occupation was a confectionary salesman.   

From various articles in the Marblehead Messenger we can see that James was rather sickly from 1904 when he was said to have rheumatism.  From an April 6, 1906 clipping it states that “James W. Hawkes who had been confined to his house since last September is out and about again with the aid of crutches and gets around slowly. He had several abscesses removed from his foot.  He was confined to his home again in January 1907 with an abscess on his foot.  On the 4th of July 1910 he was working at the T.P.M. Rix store when he was suddenly taken ill and was conveyed to his home by carriage and was confined to his bed for a lengthy time, doctors saying he needed a good rest. 

James and Mary Jane were quietly married in the evening of October 1, 1914 at the Congregational Parsonage by Rev. Leslie C. Greely.  Later on in October they were given a complete surprise at their home on 42 Lee Street when a group of women, employed at Metcalf’s Box Factory, where Mrs. Hawkes was formerly employed called on them.  After congratulations had been extended the couple were presented with a beautiful moleskin mission rocker.  During the evening the graphaphone selections were rendered by Miss Mildred Bowden.  Refreshments of ice cream, cake, candy and salted nuts were served and at a reasonable hour the guests departed after passing a pleasant evening and wishing Mr. and Mrs. Hawkes a long and happy life.

Unfortunately, it was not a long marriage.  James died at their home 42 Lee Street on Wednesday evening, January 5, 1916 after a long illness which was endured with common patience and courage. Mr. Hawkes was nearly fifty years old and was a faithful member of the Old North Congregational Church and belonged to the YMCA.  A widow and one sister, Mrs. James O’Brien survives him.  The cause of death was listed as nephritis.

In 1920 Mary Jane Hawkes was living as a widow at 32 Pleasant St. Marblehead.  In 1930 she and her brother in law Thomas Phillips, both widows at the time lived at 27 Summer Street. Her occupation was listed as a housekeeper for a private family.  Sometime before 1935 she moved to 202 Washington Street in Marblehead and then resided at 32 Beacon Street with her sister, Ruth Standley Smith and niece’s Ruth and Sarah (Aunt Sadie) Smith.  It was here that my mother and aunt called her “Aunt May Jane” when they went to visit.    Aunt May Jane died on July 28, 1954 at 32 Beacon Street from Atherosclerosis which according to Dr. Ireson she had suffered for fifteen years.  She was buried in Waterside Cemetery with her husband.

                             

         PS:

Now that I have created this mystery of Jennie and James – I found an answer in a little diary I had in my stash of goodies.  It was a small little book all tattered and torn and on the inside cover the message:

In it I found a page on which she had written:

Became acquainted with James Hawkes for the second time, September 9, 1887”

I found this on another page:

“Jim gave me my ring December 25, 1888. The year of the 2nd big fire.”

Lo and behold they had been engaged for 26 years – a long courtship.   Was it a secret engagement? 

THE END

                                              

Ebenezer Fox Richardson 1861-1942

Eben F. Richardson Once a Marbleheader, Always a Marbleheader

I came across this article in one of my many piles of genealogy stuff and the story interested me. I loved the language used by whoever wrote this sketch and “Eben” was an interesting subject. Most of this article is directly from the newspaper.  It turns out he is a distant relative of mine, a third cousin 4 times removed in my Martin line.

Ebenezer F. Richardson was the son of a fisherman born to Warren and Mary B. Gale Richardson on July 11, 1861 in Marblehead, MA. His father, Warren was born as Jean Chelier, son of Jean Chelier who died in 1825 and Priscilla Chelier and he was adopted by the Richardson’s’.  Eben married Susie Teresa Northrup on January 17, 1883 in Marblehead.  Susie was born in 1864 in Canada.  Eben and his wife moved to Chatham Street Lynn about 1898.  They had three children Henry K, Bessie Abbot, and Chester N. Richardson, all born in Marblehead.

In the sketch that was published in the Marblehead Messenger on February 26, 1943, Eben was described as “an old-time, died-in-the-wool ‘Marbleheader’ in every sense of the word.  Eben as countless Marbleheaders called him by his first name- was a Marbleheader in the commonly accepted meaning of the term: he was born here. It is an old and familiar saying that you have to be born in Marblehead to be a Marbleheader. Eben Richardson knew what it took to be a Marbleheader. Not only was he born here, but throughout his long life his love for Marblehead, its history and its people was a passion to him.”

“His many friends here recall that he visited Marblehead almost every day during the past several years, browsing around in all the old places which have changed considerably since he stood open-mouthed as a boy, listening to the stories told by the old bearded fisherman who frequented the wharves even after their sailing days were over.”

Eben was the son of a fisherman. That in itself would qualify him for the admittance to the ranks of genuine Marbleheaders.  Warren Richardson, his father was a genuine old time Marbleheader. Like so many hundreds of other men of his time, he went to see with the fishing fleets. And like hundreds of seaman whose names have been forgotten, the sea which gave him his livelihood finally claimed his life.  Warren was lost at sea – no one knows where, or how or just when. It was sometime in the year of 1864. It is believed that he was at work in the rigging of the schooner when the storm swooped down on the little craft, pitching it about and finally jerked him loose from his precarious hold. With determination inbred in the woman of that period, Eben’s mother, Mary Brooks Gale Richardson, daughter of Thomas Gale and Nancy Martin, set to and brought up her family of five children.  One of her children, John Richardson was born while his father was at sea, on the voyage that was to be his last.

“Possessed of a remarkably retentive memory, Eben remembered for years the stories he heard as a boy and wrote them down. He knew the “wharf rats’ and the “shipyarders” in the days when “rock ‘em round the corner” was more than a picturesque phrase.  He saw with his own eyes the battles between the up-towners and the down-towners, with brickbats and raw-edged missiles flying every Saturday night.  Marblehead, in his day was a town of nicknames. If fact, it is common knowledge that if anyone had a front name, nobody knew what it was, not even the man himself.”  These nicknames fascinated Eben. He supposedly compiled a list that was printed in the Marblehead Messenger, along with other articles about Marblehead, although I have not found them, yet.

Eben learned his trade of shoemaking in many of the little shops in various backyards in the neighborhoods of Marblehead.  He had himself a little shoe shop on Glover Street near the little one room school house located not far from the Glover House. Three men worked with him, as did his wife who sewed the buttons on the shoes. This business kept him busy for a number of years going into Boston for orders and returning to cut out and make the shoes.

Eben Richardson

Eben also had a great interest in musical bands. When the bands came to town he would follow them around, especially enjoying the popular martial music. Sousa marches were his favorite to listen to and play. He yearned to be a musician but had no means for learning any instrument. Musical records were not readily available during this time.  When he finally got the chance to play he was a natural musician. In time he became a master of the organ and piano, the trombone, the tuba and the bass horn. He also dabbled with the violin.  On November 19, 1878, at the age of 15, his mother went with him to Boston to buy his first organ, Mason and Hamlin cabinet costing $116.50, which he had been saving for.  He was practically a self-taught musician. He took a few lessons to learn to manipulate the organ pedals, but received no more instruction until he became a grown man.

In the early 1900’s he began to study with Prof. Frederick Zuchtsman of Marblehead, a widely known musician, in order to learn the “school system” to become a music instructor in the schools.  He gave up his job in the shoe shop and became an instructor in Marblehead, Swampscott and Manchester, NH.  He played with the famous Salem Cadet Band and several other local bands.  One of the highlights of his band career was a trip to Europe with the Salem Cadet Bank in about 1895.  The band was engaged to accompany the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company for several weeks during the summer, and the musicians played in London and Paris.  He also was an organist and choir director in many Protestant Churches in Lynn, Marblehead and neighboring communities and in many fraternal organizations.

When the depression was felt in musical circles and the demand for bands dwindled, Eben went back to the shoemaking business. He was in excellent health and had no idea of retiring and was at his bench at the Maxwell Shoe Company in Lynn almost to the day of his death on February 13, 1942.

Memorial Day In Marblehead in the 1960’s.

Marblehead Musings by Marge Armstrong

Dan Dixey photo OKO's 1966Hat’s Off!

Along the street there comes a blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,

A flash of color beneath the sky:

Hat’s off!

The flag is passing by!! 

This is one of the lines of the poem “The Flag Goes By” which we memorized and recited at the Memorial Day Celebration at the Gerry School Playground in Marblehead. Every year each school in town held Memorial Day Services. I believe we learned this one in Mrs. Roller’s third grade class. As I remember we had to really blare out, “Hat’s Off.”  Every year chairs were set up on the playground and we sat with our class, reciting our poems and singing patriotic songs as our parents watched us. We probably wore a patriotic outfit complete with a white cardigan sweater.  I think one year we played a patriotic number on our song flutes. At the junior and senior…

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Knott Vickery Martin 1820 – 1898 Marblehead Patriot

DAMN THE HOG!!

Knott Vickery Martin, the great grandson of Knott Martin 1st and my second cousin 5 times removed was one of the first men to answer the call for the Civil War.  He is also the 2nd cousin once removed of Benjamin Franklin Martin who commanded the Mugford Guards during the Civil War.  Knott V. was born on July 11, 1820 in Marblehead to Knott and Hannah Goss Martin.  He married Mary Pedrick Thompson on November 14, 1858. She was born on November 14, 1819, the daughter of Jonathan and Mary R. (Homan) Thompson.   Knott died on August 26, 1898 and Mary died May 6, 1906; they never had children.  They were married late in life, however according to the 1850 census, and the 1855 census he is listed as residing in the same household with his future wife Mary Thompson and her parents until they married in 1858.

According to his Civil War Enlistment record he was 5’9 ¼” tall, light complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  He received his early education in the public schools in Marblehead, leaving school at the age of 13 to learn the shoemaking trade.  He worked as a shoemaker until age 27 when he was forced to give it up due to ill health.  His physician advised him that due to being “consumptive” he needed an outdoor occupation of some sort to improve his health, so he became a butcher.  He got a taste of the military when he joined the Marblehead Light Infantry.  He became so proficient that he was promoted up the ranks and on October 6, 1852 he was commissioned as its Captain.  Under his command the company soon reached a high standard of excellence and was recognized throughout the State as one of the best disciplined organizations in the Massachusetts Voluntary Militia. This is how he got his training for the Civil War which he joined at the age of forty.

A sketch of Captain Knott V. Martin appeared in the Boston Globe on January 29, 1918:

“When the Civil War broke out Knott V. Martin was a butcher and Captain of the Marblehead Light Infantry, one of the best drilled and disciplined organizations of its kind in the State. Late in the afternoon of April 15, 1861, Lieut. Col. Hinks of the 8th Mass. Regiment rode into Marblehead to notify the Commanders of the three companies stationed there to be ready to take the first train, the following morning to answer President Lincoln’s call for troops”.

“I found Captain Martin in his slaughter house, with the carcass of a hog, just killed and in readiness for the “scald.” On communication to the Captain my orders, I advised him to immediately cause the bells of the town to be rung, and to get all the recruits he could. Taking his coat from a peg, he seemed for a moment to hesitate about leaving his business unfinished, and then turned to me, and with words of emphatic indifference in regard to it, put the garment on, with his arms stained with blood and his shirt sleeves but half rolled down, and with me left the premises to rally his company, exclaiming,

Damn the hog!’  

The next morning he and his men were on their way to Boston, one of the first companies to answer the call” and the rest is history.

This cartoon is found online in Civil War illustrations Charles Carleton Coffin Drum-Beat of the Nation (New York, NY: Harper & Brothers, 1915)

 

 

 

 

 

 He enlisted on April 16, 1861 as Captain of Co. C Eighth Infantry and was discharged from Boston on August 4, 1861, serving his required three months.  He re-enlisted on September 28, 1861 as Captain in Co. B, Twenty third Mass Infantry and discharged May 12 1863.  He re-enlisted a third time as Private in Co. H, 59th Mass Infantry on March 12, 1863 and was wounded on July 29, 1864 in Petersburg, VA and finally discharged on June 28, 1865 in Boston, MA.  In a battle at Newbern he was wounded by a spent cannonball and lost eight inches from the main bone of his right leg, becoming permanently disabled.

Following his discharge from the War he was elected a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives serving in that capacity during 1866 and 1867.  He was then appointed Messenger to the House of Representatives for two more years.  In May 1869 he was appointed Postmaster in Marblehead, a position he held until he retired on May 16, 1885.  He then began raising poultry.  His last connection with the military was during the period of June 1866 to January 1868 when he had command of the Marblehead Sutton Light Infantry. 

In July of 1895 his friends in Marblehead surprised him with a 75th birthday party and he was presented with the sum of $82.00 from 82 of his friends who wished to show their appreciation and regard for him.  Knott used this money to buy himself a fine gold-headed ebony cane which he used the remainder of his life.  The handle was inscribed to show it was presented to him by his friends and the date of the presentation. 

Knott’s niece, Marcia Selman wrote an article published in the Marblehead Messenger in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth. She described him as having an extraordinary memory for statistical details and dates and had a strong grasp of the town’s genealogy. He had intended to put the Martin genealogy to print but he never did.  She described him as “being remembered by many as the open-handed, liberal spirited friend of every public reform, and innumerable private charities.  Never wealthy, partly because he gave away the surplus of his income that almost every other man would have invested for his own pecuniary advantage.  He was a contributor to any project for improving the interest of the town that seemed to him of wise character, and the number of his private beneficiaries that lessened suffering, encouraged deserving merit and cheered the declining years of long term friends, was legion.  His name was worthy to be written as ‘one who loved his fellow man’.”

Knott Vickery Martin 1820 – 1898 Marblehead Patriot

Knott V Martin photo

DAMN THE HOG!!

Knott Vickery Martin, the great grandson of Knott Martin 1st and my second cousin 5 times removed was one of the first men to answer the call for the Civil War.  He is also the 2nd cousin once removed of Benjamin Franklin Martin who commanded the Mugford Guards during the Civil War.  Knott V. was born on July 11, 1820 in Marblehead to Knott and Hannah Goss Martin.  He married Mary Pedrick Thompson on November 14, 1858. She was born on November 14, 1819, the daughter of Jonathan and Mary R. (Homan) Thompson.   Knott died on August 26, 1898 and Mary died May 6, 1906; they never had children.  They were married late in life, however according to the 1850 census, and the 1855 census he is listed as residing in the same household with his future wife Mary Thompson and her parents until they married in 1858.

According to his Civil War Enlistment record he was 5’9 ¼” tall, light complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  He received his early education in the public schools in Marblehead, leaving school at the age of 13 to learn the shoemaking trade.  He worked as a shoemaker until age 27 when he was forced to give it up due to ill health.  His physician advised him that due to being “consumptive” he needed an outdoor occupation of some sort to improve his health, so he became a butcher.  He got a taste of the military when he joined the Marblehead Light Infantry.  He became so proficient that he was promoted up the ranks and on October 6, 1852 he was commissioned as its Captain.  Under his command the company soon reached a high standard of excellence and was recognized throughout the State as one of the best disciplined organizations in the Massachusetts Voluntary Militia. This is how he got his training for the Civil War which he joined at the age of forty.

A sketch of Captain Knott V. Martin appeared in the Boston Globe on January 29, 1918:

“When the Civil War broke out Knott V. Martin was a butcher and Captain of the Marblehead Light Infantry, one of the best drilled and disciplined organizations of its kind in the State. Late in the afternoon of April 15, 1861, Lieut. Col. Hinks of the 8th Mass. Regiment rode into Marblehead to notify the Commanders of the three companies stationed there to be ready to take the first train, the following morning to answer President Lincoln’s call for troops”.

“I found Captain Martin in his slaughter house, with the carcass of a hog, just killed and in readiness for the “scald.” On communication to the Captain my orders, I advised him to immediately cause the bells of the town to be rung, and to get all the recruits he could. Taking his coat from a peg, he seemed for a moment to hesitate about leaving his business unfinished, and then turned to me, and with words of emphatic indifference in regard to it, put the garment on, with his arms stained with blood and his shirt sleeves but half rolled down, and with me left the premises to rally his company, exclaiming,

Damn the hog!’  

Martin, Knott V hog cartoon

This cartoon is found online in Civil War illustrations Charles Carleton Coffin Drum-Beat of the Nation (New York, NY: Harper & Brothers, 1915)

The next morning he and his men were on their way to Boston, one of the first companies to answer the call and the rest is history.

 He enlisted on April 16, 1861 as Captain of Co. C Eighth Infantry and was discharged from Boston on August 4, 1861, serving his required three months.  He re-enlisted on September 28, 1861 as Captain in Co. B, Twenty third Mass Infantry and discharged May 12 1863.  He re-enlisted a third time as Private in Co. H, 59th Mass Infantry on March 12, 1863 and was wounded on July 29, 1864 in Petersburg, VA and finally discharged on June 28, 1865 in Boston, MA.  In a battle at New Bern he was wounded by a spent cannonball and lost eight inches from the main bone of his right leg, becoming permanently disabled.

Following his discharge from the War he was elected a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives serving in that capacity during 1866 and 1867.  He was then appointed Messenger to the House of Representatives for two more years.  In May 1869 he was appointed Postmaster in Marblehead, a position he held until he retired on May 16, 1885.  He then began raising poultry.  His last connection with the military was during the period of June 1866 to January 1868 when he had command of the Marblehead Sutton Light Infantry. 

In July of 1895 his friends in Marblehead surprised him with a 75th birthday party and he was presented with the sum of $82.00 from 82 of his friends who wished to show their appreciation and regard for him.  Knott used this money to buy himself a fine gold-headed ebony cane which he used the remainder of his life.  The handle was inscribed to show it was presented to him by his friends and the date of the presentation. 

Knott’s niece, Marcia Selman wrote an article published in the Marblehead Messenger in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth. She described him as having an extraordinary memory for statistical details and dates and had a strong grasp of the town’s genealogy. He had intended to put the Martin genealogy to print but he never did.  She described him as “being remembered by many as the open-handed, liberal spirited friend of every public reform, and innumerable private charities.  Never wealthy, partly because he gave away the surplus of his income that almost every other man would have invested for his own pecuniary advantage.  He was a contributor to any project for improving the interest of the town that seemed to him of wise character, and the number of his private beneficiaries that lessened suffering, encouraged deserving merit and cheered the declining years of long term friends, was legion.  His name was worthy to be written as ‘one who loved his fellow man’.”

The name “Knott Martin”

Knott Martin

This has been a name that has always intrigued me while doing my family history research.  So far I have come across 16 Knott Martins’ in my family tree, which makes research and sorting out who is who very interesting.  To me it is a curious name.  The surname “Knott” came from when the Anglo-Saxon tribes ruled over Britain. It was originally derived from a family having lived at  “the knot”, the summit of a rocky hill, from the residence near that place.  A very fitting name to give a Marbleheader, living on the rocky coastline of Marblehead.

The first Knott Martin in my line appeared on July 12, 1708 when Knott Martin, my 6th great grandfather was born.  He was born to Thomas Martin and Eleanor Knott.  In this time period the first born son was usually given his grandfather’s  name, which was Thomas. The second son was given the mother’s father’s  name, in this case using the surname Knott as a first name. Knott Martin has been carried on for generations. The last “Knot” I have in my family tree was born in 1900 and died in 1975. 

I will start this series of blogs on Knott Martin with “Knott the first”.  This can also get confusing because depending on what family the “Knott” was born into he could be the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and so on, resulting in several Knott the 2nd’s and Knott the 3rd’s. 

Knott Martin born on July 12, 1708 married Sarah Green Arnold in 1730 and they had 10 children, only one of whom died before reaching adulthood. Sarah presumably was the daughter of Peter Arnold and Sarah Green and she died before 1755.  There is family lore that she was somehow related to Benedict Arnold, although I am not sure if this has ever been proven. To make research even more interesting this is where the name Peter and Arnold Martin originated, and continues through the family.

After Sarah’s death Knott 1st married Ann Jackson Girdler in 1765 and together they had two children. She had previously been married to Benjamin Girdler and had two daughters with him.  Knott died in April 22, 1796 in Marblehead. 

Knott and Sarah had 10 children:

  1. Thomas 1732- 1828  married Martha Nicholson
  2. Knott Jr. 1734-1822  married Mercy Brooks, widow of his brother John
  3. Sarah 1736 – 1751 married Daniel Felton
  4. Arnold 1738 – 1740
  5. Eleanor 1740 – 1821 married John Vickery
  6. Hannah 1743 – 1835 married William Lecraw
  7. John 1745   died before 1810  married Mercy Brooks
  8. Richard 1747 – 1836 married Hannah Cruff
  9. Arnold 1749 – 1824 married Sarah Griste Mugford
  10. Mary 1751 –  she married John Goodwin

Knott and his second wife Ann had 2 children:

  1. Elizabeth 1765 – 1843 married Thomas Doliber
  2. Bartholomew Jackson 1768 – 1826 married Mary Bassett..

A newspaper article from the Alexandria Gazette, January 26, 1820 (which was originally published in the Salem Gazette), tell of the extraordinary longevity of this particular Martin line.  This article is also where we see Knott given the name “Dr. Knott Martin” and where we can get the approximate age of his children:

“Dr. Knott Martin of Marblehead who died at 88, left seven children by his first wife who are now living at the following ages, viz: Thomas, aged 88; Knott 87, Eleanor 80, Hannah 77, Richard 73, and Mary 69. By his second wife, Betsey 53 and Bartholomew 51.  He had three other children, one of whom died in infancy and the other two at an advanced age.”

Knott and Sarah had at least 50 grandchildren and another 7 from his marriage with Ann. From the 6 sons of Knott and Sarah he had 5 grandsons with the name Knott Martin and his son Bartholomew had a son he named Knott.  This gives us a total of 8 Knott’s so far

I came across this funny anecdote in “The Watchtower”, February 16, 1838 from the Yeoman’s Gazette. I am not sure where and when it originated because reprints can be found in many newspapers.

“Not many years ago, a man appeared in court, whether a plaintiff, defendant or witness, tradition does not inform us, be this as it may, the following dialogue ensued:

Court:  What is your name, Sir?

Answer:  My name is Knott Martin, your honor.

Court:  Well, what is it?

Answer:  It is Knott Martin

Court: ‘Knott Martin’ again! We don’t ask you what your name is not, but what it is. No contempt of Court, Sir!

Answer: If your honor will give me leave, I’ll spell my name.

Court:  Well, spell it!

Answer: K n o double t,  Knott, mar, mar tin, tin, Martin, Knott Martin.

Court:  O, very well, Mr. Martin, we see through it now, but this is one of the most knotty cases we have had before us for some time.” – (Yeoman’s Gazette)

I wonder how many Knott Martin’s have had this problem in life!!!

To be continued……

           

Samuel Clemmons Martin 1817-1902

Martin, samuel c

Samuel Clemmons Martin, Sr.  another of my Martin ancestors and a sea captain.  He is my second cousin 5 times removed and a brother to Jane Clemmons Martin, 1st woman lighthouse keeper, who I wrote about in an early blog.  Samuel was baptized on June 21, 1817 in Marblehead, MA, the son of Ambrose and Elizabeth Clemmons Martin and he died on May 5, 1902.  Samuel married Hannah Selman Phillips (1817-1902) on March 17, 1842 and they had six children.  They moved to Boston in about 1850 when he became a pilot in Boston Harbor.  A pilot is what they called tug boat captains in that time period.

In the Marblehead Messenger of Friday May 9, 1902 there is a story of Samuel’s eventful career. He was a seafaring man from a young age, learning his way around the sea from his father Captain Ambrose Martin who after retiring from the sea became the lighthouse keeper on Baker’s Island for 25 years.

When Samuel was about 17 years old, about 1834, he ran away in a ship bound for the Fiji Islands. This first voyage was a memorable one as his vessel was shipwrecked  and he was cast ashore on the Ascension Islands with several companions where they lived for several months with a tribe of savages. Samuel became the Royal Counselor to the savage chief. The king took possession of their clothes and adopted them as his official robe of the state, leaving Samuel and his companions to clothe themselves in garments made of leaves and straw and built themselves huts for shelter.  Eventually an English ship came along and agreed to take them home. This was not a direct route home, Samuel sailed around the seas for three or four years finally returning home,  to the surprise of his family and friends who had taken him for dead.

Samuel did not remain home for very long before he set sail to the Pacific once again.  At some point he returned to the same Island he had lived on and when the Chief heard that he was in the harbor he immediately caused a great celebration in his honor, sending many gifts including a nicely browned portion of a human thigh.

On another adventure to the Fiji Coast Captain Martin and his men were suddenly attacked  by a crowd of savages and were forced to flee in small dory boats rigged with a spritsail.  A heavy sea was running with the wind blowing inshore it looked like they would not escape the savages chasing after them in their faster felucca rigged craft.  As the savages got closed Captain Martin told one of his companions that he was going to try something he had learned from the Bible and if that did not help them nothing would. He called all hands to help him as he took a big five gallon can of oil that they had aboard the boat and lashed it to the fore rigging.  He then stuck a marlin spike in the bottom of it and oil began to run slowly out into the sea. After a few minutes the dory stiffened up and began to glide over the tops of the waves as smoothly as if it were controlled by steam.  The dory got away from the savages and Martin and company returned to their ship. The entire crew told this story for years and said they owed their life to the ingenuity and quickness of Captain Martin.

In the late 1840’s Captain Martin gave up the sea and went to live in Salem, MA.  He took out a pilot’s commission for the harbor which he had learned as a ten year old boy. After three or four years in Salem he went to Boston to begin his long career as a Boston Pilot.  He received his pilot’s license on December 6, 1847 and continued in that service until January 1, 1893, forty six years later.

From his obituary in a Boston paper is a description of his funeral service.  “Captain Samuel C. Martin was the oldest of the Boston pilots when he died on Monday, May 5, 1902 at his home on Webster St, East Boston, MA, from complications of diseases.  He had not been well for a long time and after the death of his wife on March 10, 1902 he failed rapidly.  That and the death of his nephew Elbridge Martin, also a pilot, who died suddenly on his boat recently were hard deaths for the venerable captain to endure.  Many family and friends attended his funeral service held at his home. At the head rested a pillow of white roses, marked “Father” and at the foot two sheaves.  A large bank of white roses and lilies was marked “Grandpa.” The Pilot’s Relief Association contributed a large anchor of lilies and roses and a cable of purple flowers.  The Rev. R. Perry Bush of Chelsea conducted the service and the pall bearers were John C Fawcett, Henry C. Patterson, George W Lawler and Thomas Cooper, all brother pilots.”

A rather entertaining story was found in a Boston Newspaper, Daily Atlas, Boston, MA, Tuesday, February 19, 1850.  “Lost His Bacon — Last Saturday, Mr. Samuel C Martin, one of our pilots and a worthy citizen of East Boston returned home from a cruise in the bay with an appetite sharp as a grey hound’s shins; to satisfy which, he purchased a fine ham and had it cooked in prime order. Smoking hot, with fixins to suit, it was placed upon the table and his better half “light and airy as a fairy” bounded up stairs to invite him to dinner.  They descended, with stomach rendering to relate, the ham had vanished, literally vanished and nothing but a streak of its savory scent remained. In an agony of despair, heightened by hunger, he darted into the streets to search for the ham, but alas no ham was there. A solitary porker, basking in the sun, was the only living thing he saw. His ham was gone, stolen by some pork loving thief”

On September 25, 1902 the Boston Herald told of what happened to his estate in East Boston. Thomas O McEnany has sold at auction the estate of Samuel C Martin at 252 Webster St., East Boston a frame dwelling and about 1500 feet of land assessed at $2500 the purchaser being P.J. Flanagan who buys for investment for $2500

Children of Samuel Clemmons Martin and Hannah Selman Phillips:

 1.  Samuel Martin  July 27, 1842 – October 13, 1842

2.  James Lawrence Martin  December 10, 1842 – February 7, 1932. He married Lucy Jane Black in 1868 and lived in Melrose, MA. They had 5 children.

3. Dora P. Martin  November 1845 – February 7, 1932  She was single and a dressmaker.

4. Hannah S Martin  1848 – August 4, 1848  she was 8 months when she died

5. Samuel C Martin  1852 – June 6, 1853

6. Samuel C Martin Jr. March 7, 1854 in Boston  – February 7, 1923 in Marblehead.  He was a music teacher

 

 

 

USS Marblehead

Recently I posted a few pictures that I came across in my collection of the USS Marblehead.  There have been three USS Marblehead US Navy ships named after the Port of Marblehead. The first was launched in 1861 and was a gunboat that served in the Civil War.  The second was launched in 1892 and served in the Spanish American War and was sold in 1921.  The third and the topic of this post was launched in 1923 and served in WW II and was scraped in 1947.

USS Marblehead

On July 1, 1918 the navy authorized the building of the third USS Marblehead and it was built by William Cramp and Sons shipbuilders in Philadelphia.  She (as boat’s are called) had an overall length of 555 feet 6 inches and was beam was 55 feet 4 inches.  She was powered by 4 Parsons steam turbines generated by 12 White Forester boilers and could reach a top speed of 25 knots (40 mph).

Mrs Joseph Evans (Hannah Martin Graves), a Gold Star mother from Marblehead was given the honor of christening the USS Marblehead in Philidelphia in October 1923.  Hannah  was born November 12, 1854, the daughter of Samuel E. Graves and Abigail Phillips.  On May 27, 1884 she married Joseph Evans, the son of William T. Evans and Abigail M. Caswell.  Hannah died on August 10, 1942.  Joseph and Hannah had three children:

  1. Annie Alice Evans born September 4, 1884 who married John Edward Harris
  2. Aubrey Lewis Evans born September 4, 1884  single
  3. Charles Herbert Evans born March 11, 1887.  He married Mary L. Salkins on March 15, 1910.  Charles served in World War I and was killed in the Chateau Thierry Drive in France on July 20, 1918. ( you can read more about him and WW I in my book “Marblehead and World War I  At Home and Overseas).

It was noted in the Boston Herald October 7, 1923 that ” Mrs. Evans, whose only son was killed in World War I will Christen the boat in honor of her native town.”  Instead of the time honored champagne used to christen boats, Mrs. Evans used a bottle filled with water from Marblehead Harbor.  “The ship took her initial dip in the Delaware River with the grace of a yacht.”  She was welcomed by a shrieking siren chorus from scores of river craft.  A large party of Marblehead officials and naval officers from Philadelphia and other cities witnessed the launch.

1923 Launching of USS Marblehead

After her launch the USS Marblehead, departed for Boston onto the English Channel and into the Mediterranean Sea.  She made many voyages from 1923 to 1941 when on December 7, 1941 she received the message “Japan started hostilities: govern yourselves accordingly.”  One of her battles in the Makassar Strait she maneuvered safely through for three battles.  Then the fourth wave of seven bombers released bombs on the USS Marblehead and she took 2 direct hits and fires swept throughout the ship, but she continued onto port with her gunners still firing.  The damaged cruiser was left with 15 dead or mortally wounded and 84 seriously injured.  She was repaired and her last mission was in southern France.

The USS Marblehead returned to the United States where she conducted a summer training cruise for Naval Academy midshipman and then entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard where she was decommissioned on November 1, 1945. Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on November 28 and her hull was scraped on February 27, 1946. Launching of USS Marblead 1923

 

 

 

Jane Clemmons Martin 1809 – 1871 Marblehead’s First Female Lighthouse Keeper

marblehead_orig_dwelling_lighthouse

Jane Clemmons Martin my 2nd cousin 5 times removed, was one of ten children born to Ambrose and Elizabeth (Clemmons) Martin. She was baptized on June 25, 1809 in the First Congregational Church of Marblehead, MA. She must have been a hearty soul as she followed in her father’s footsteps and was the first Light House Keeper on the East Coast. Ambrose was the keeper of Baker Island Light for 25 years, retiring in 1850. Jane had lived with her father and assisted him in taking care of Baker’s Light so was well qualified to handle Marblehead’s Light House.  

The light house was put into operation on October 10, 1835. On August 30, 1831 the Marblehead citizens requested that a lighthouse be erected on the point of the Neck at the entrance to the harbor. Congress appointed $4500 for the lighthouse on June 30, 1834. The building was a 23 foot white tower with a keeper’s cottage attached to the tower by a covered walkway. There were 10 lamps inside the octagonal lantern which was fueled by whale oil. The fixed white light was 53 feet above mean high water. In 1857 a sixth order Fresnel lamp replaced the old system of multiple lamps (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fresnel_lens). Mr. Darling stated to Congress in 1843 that “the tower is leaky about the window casing, there being no recess in the brick for the window frames. The lantern sweats considerably, and formerly I wiped up large quantities of water accumulating from this cause. The dwelling house is very damp, the water comes through the walls and the chimneys are all smoky.” jane-c-martin-boston-transcript

In the Boston Transcript newspaper dated November 17, 1860 we learn that “Miss Jane C. Martin has been appointed Keeper of the Marblehead Light when Ezekiel Darling, the first Light House Keeper resigned due to poor health and being blind. She maintained the light from 1860 to 1863 when James Goodwin replaced her. Her job as keeper was to carry the night’s supply of oil up the 134 steps every morning to fill the well and then polish the lens and pulled down the curtains that prevented the sun from discoloring the lens. Before 7 PM she would climb the stairs again to fire the light.  

She had quite an adventure at the lighthouse in February 1863 when the Schooner Mary E. Hiltz, John Hiltz, Master went ashore on Marblehead Neck during a Sunday night snowstorm at about 9 o’clock. The Captain mistaking the Marblehead Light for Eastern Point Light and the schooner was totally wrecked and one of the crew, Thomas Christopher of Newfoundland was drowned. The six remaining crew members remained on the wreck until Monday morning when they were successful in coming ashore, having lost everything but the clothes on their backs. They reached the lighthouse where Miss Jane C. Martin, the lighthouse keeper made them as comfortable as possible. They then went into town where they were supplied with new and dry clothing. The body of Mr. Christopher was recovered on Tuesday morning and after a funeral service in the stone church he was properly interred.

In 1850 Jane lived with her parents and two siblings in Salem, MA. Sometime between 1850 and 1860 she moved to 150 Webster Street, East Boston and lived with her brother Elbridge Gerry Martin and his children. He was in charge of a pilot boat in Boston. I would presume she went to live with him to help him with his children as he became a widower in July 1852 when his first wife Rebecca Homan Dixey died leaving him with five children ages 1 to 10. In 1854 he married Ceceline Giddings who left him a widower again when she died in 1857, after giving him another son.

In 1870 Jane was also living in Boston with her brother.

She appeared to be an independent and adventurous woman. According to the newspaper article in the Boston Traveler on September 17, 1860 she was involved in a carriage accident. “She was driving through Chelsea Street in her buggy when the horse became frightened and ran off at a great pace until the buggy collided with a wagon which caused the lady to be thrown in violence to the ground cutting her head badly and several other injuries.” She was taken to her residence and a physician was called.

She never married and died on November 22, 1871 in Boston, MA from kidney disease.

 marblehead1896The lighthouse design changed in 1893 when a request was made for a new light and tower and a decision was made to build the 105 foot cast iron tower which is still standing.